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Televised redemption: Black religious media and racial empowerment

By Debra Mason

Book cover of Televised Redemption

Photo Credit: New York University Press

Televised Redemption: Black Religious Media and Racial Empowerment discusses religious media’s role in empowering black people in the face of “institutional structures of white supremacy” (Rouse, Jackson, and Frederick, 2016). Through the use of anthropological theory and ethnographic research, the authors explore how this medium has served a role in changing the perception of black people by humanizing and adjusting attitudes toward the race, defending blacks’ “goodness and reason” as compared to whites, and arming African Americans with the necessary knowledge and skills to handle an often discouraging world with a new self-perception (Rouse, Jackson, and Frederick, 2016). The book elaborates on the history of African American religious media’s role in legitimizing blacks’ existence as moral citizens and promoting racial justice (Rouse, Jackson, and Frederick, 2016). “Ultimately, our goal has been to make visible the extraordinary labor and conceptual brilliance that has gone into trying to articulate a postcolonial blackness that effectively counters racism” (Rouse, Jackson, and Frederick, 2016). The book is separated into several parts, including “Black Christian Redemption,” “Racial Redemption,” “Divine Redemption,” “Reimagined Possibilities,” “Race, Islam, and Longings for Inclusion” and “Citizens as Stewards. Televised Redemption: Black Religious Media and Racial Empowerment can be purchased here.

Bibliography:
Rouse, C. J., Jackson, Jr., J.L., & Frederick, M.F. (2016). Televised Redemption: Black Religious Media and Racial Empowerment. New York: New York University Press.

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